ANTHOLOGY CD



2 CD set (59 tracks, 147 minutes of music!)
20 pg. booklet
Ltd. Edition
(only 500  pressed)

Featuring their entire 1965 RCA album in stereo, 45 versions, alt. takes,
releases as "The Jaybees", "Carnival Connection", "Peter & The Pipers"
+ post releases - from surviving master tapes & restored, remastered vinyl

Booklet packed with informative notes, memorabilia and photos
courtesy of Allan Nicholls & Bill Hill

1. CHERYL   (Al "J.B." Nicholls & The Playboys)
2. ALL MY LOVING 
(Al "J.B." Nicholls & The Playboys)
3. CHANCES
(45 version)
4. TEARS OF WOE
5. ONE LOVE, YOUR LOVE
(45 version)
6. I’M NOT SATISFIED
(45 version)
7. MY DELIGHT
(45 version)
8. DON’T ASK ME TO BE TRUE
(45 version)
9. LOVE, HAPPINESS & SWEET YOU
(45 version)
10. SUMMER LOVE
11. TV Interview 
unreleased
12. THEN & THERE
13. ONE LOVE, YOUR LOVE
14. TREAT ME SPECIALLY
15. DON’T ASK ME TO BE TRUE
16. STICKS & STONES (alternate take)
unreleased
17. STICKS & STONES
18. I’M THE LONELY ONE
19. WALKING THE DOG
20. LOVE, HAPPINESS & SWEET YOU
21. I'M NOT SATISFIED (alternate take)
unreleased
22. I’M NOT SATISFIED
23. TRUE LOVE WILL COME TO YOU
24. MY DELIGHT
25. CHANCES
26 - 29. SWING THE JINGLE - Coca Cola Promos
30. LEAVE MY WOMAN ALONE 
unreleased-stereo
31. POOR ANNE  stereo debut from master tape
32. MY LOVE
33. TRUE LOVE WILL COME TO YOU (backing track)
unreleased-stereo
34. POOR ANNE (alternate version backing track)
unreleased-stereo
1. I'M A LONER - The Jaybees
2. DO YOU THINK I’M IN LOVE
- The Jaybees  (alternate take) unreleased
3. DO YOU THINK I’M IN LOVE
- The Jaybees
4. FOOTSTEPS IN THE SNOW
- The Jaybees
5. ONE LOVE, YOUR LOVE
- The Jaybees  (soundtrack version)
6. I THINK OF HER
- The Jaybees
7. UNBELIEVABLE
- The Jaybees
8. WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE
- The Jaybees
9. BAD SIGN
- The Jaybees
10. THEME FROM "EXODUS"
- The Jaybees  unreleased
11. GIRL ON THE HIT-PARADE
- Peter And The Pipers
12. ROCKIN' TO MARS
- Peter And The Pipers
13. POSTER MAN
- Carnival Connection
14. ALFRED APPLEBY
- Carnival Connection
15. NO TIME
- Carnival Connection  unreleased
16. DOCTOR TOM
- Freedom North
17. ORDINARY MAN
- Freedom North
18. GOIN’ DOWN
- Allan Nicholls 
19. SOUNDS AND NOISES
- Allan Nicholls
20. COMING APART
- Allan Nicholls 
21. LET THE MUSIC PLAY
- Allan Nicholls
22. THE JOKE
- Allan Nicholls
23. DANCE A LITTLE STEP
- Mashmakhan (featuring Allan Nicholls)
24. I'LL LOVE YOU FROM FAR AWAY
- Allan Nicholls
25. TRY
- Allan Nicholls & Bill Hill  unreleased


$20
price includes worldwide shipping

 


PHOTO ARCHIVES
J.B. and THE PLAYBOYS
THE JAYBEES
THE CARNIVAL CONNECTION +


Allan Nicholls tells his story to Brock, Ontario University (Dec. 2010)
READ:
"What A Trip"


 

“this is the way a reissue should be handled” - 60sGarageBands.com
"...an outstanding piece of work"
"the packaging and the rarities make this an absolute must have"
"as an avid collector, this is one of the finest collections I’ve seen"
"I bought the vinyl in 1965, and I just want to say how pleased I am with the clarity & quality"
"great sound quality & it puts the liner notes for most major label releases to shame. A really professional package"
"This set is a treasure I never expected to see on CD and the added material
of earlier and later tracks by the group members is totally awesome"


"During the sixties, J.B. and The Playboys stood tall as one of Montreal, Canada's most successful bands. A two CD collection, "Anthology," covers everything the group concocted in their different incarnations and name changes. The package also includes a detailed history of the band, and many cool photos. 

Although a version of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's "All My Loving" confirms an acknowledgement of the British Invasion sounds of the day, most of the songs on the first installment of "Anthology" expose more of a late fifties and early sixties pop influence in the vein of Buddy Holly, Tommy Roe and Bobby Vee. The instrumental work further suggests a definitive Shadows fixation. And then there's "Poor Anne," which carries a bit of a rockabilly bend.

 

The members of J.B. and The Playboys were blessed with the ability to write their own material. Numbers like "One Love, Your Love," "I'm Not Satisfied," "Don't Ask Me To Be True" and "My Delight" are sweet, catchy and filled with radio-ready appeal. When the band switched their handle to The Jaybees, they buffed up their approach somewhat, resulting in the garage punk flavored "I'm a Loner." Tracks by Carnival Connection and Freedom North show the band engaging in both paisley laced pop and hard rock stylings. Attractively presented, "Anthology" is a must have for those who dig vintage pop rock."   Beverly Paterson - Twist & Shake magazine



Anyone who grew up in Montreal in the mid-60s will remember the pop-possessed, matching-suited combo - our answer to the British Invasion - that put a local face on the jangling guitars and energetic harmonies of the era. The J.B. & The Playboys material - 34 tracks on Disc One - sounds terrific more than 40 years on, with even the more disposable sides shining with an irresistible periodic charm. The second disc, featuring the band in its latter incarnation as The Jaybees, plus offshoots like Carnival Connection and Freedom North, is almost as much fun. With this fine collection available at last, we have two words for the powers that be who decide what comes out of the vaults: The Rabble. Please.
  Bernard Perusse - Montreal Gazette


Blitz Magazine Review by Michael McDowell


“What’s in a name? Plenty, we feel. For that reason, you will notice a slight change of name (on the masthead of this publication)".

So began the editorial in Blitz number 26 in May 1978. With that issue, the transition that had begun eight issues earlier was finally completed.

In August 1975, the magazine’s founder (who left in 1976) introduced in the newsletter format the publication that eventually became known as Blitz. However, it debuted with a name that was definitely not appropriate for the mission statement and editorial focus of the magazine.

When current Editor/Publisher Michael McDowell took over the reins in late 1976 with issue number 18, the main objectives for the magazine were to upgrade it from a do-it-yourself newsletter to an editorially and graphically solid magazine, with emphasis on academically sound journalism; complete with a name that better reflected its contents.

With each issue between number 18 and number 26, the magazine’s logo on the cover was presented in such a way that the word “Blitz” became more and more prominent until it finally sat alone on the masthead. And although Blitz may not have been the ideal choice for a name, it does indeed more accurately reflect its ongoing editorial focus.

Likewise, the music which Blitz has covered for the past thirty-one years has been given a variety of names: rhythm and blues, doo wop, garage rock, country and western, punk rock, easy listening, jazz and so forth. Collectively, these highly distinctive and essential musical genres have come together under the banner of rock and roll. Hence Blitz’s motto, “The Rock And Roll Magazine For Thinking People”.

Those labels that have presented this art form at its peak have used a variety of names that, although not necessarily musical in nature, nonetheless handsomely depicted the art in their grooves. Few would argue that such venerable names as Sun, Hideout, Cameo, Blue Cat and Prestige are not reflective of the work of the legends they represent.

To be sure, to name a record label Rhythm And Blues, Doo Wop, Easy Listening or Garage Rock would project for such a label an image that indicates limitations in artistic perspective. For example, would an Eddy Arnold release on a label called Garage Rock be appropriate? Likewise, would a 45 by Black Flag on a label called Easy Listening do justice to either artist or label?

Most assuredly not. A musical genre’s name should reflect the essence of its artistic vision, which is more often the case with the aforementioned distinctions. Nonetheless, over the years, many who have sought to promote the cause of rock and roll have done so by associating the art form with peripheral distinctions that have little (if any) bearing on the aesthetic merit of the music itself.

One such distinction is the lowest common denominator concept loosely known as nostalgia, which asserts that an artistic work is inexorably linked to the chronological period in which it was created; complete with all of the trappings of the contemporary culture and with the implication that the work in general is intertwined with the personal memories of the era held by the average listener.

To be sure, to imply that a given artist entered the recording studio with the thought of linking their artistic statement in submission to whatever fads or trends were extant in popular culture or with the day to day occurrences in the lives of a casual listener or occasional record buyer is ludicrous, at best.

In turn, such limitations gave rise to the equally inappropriate link to chronology that resulted in the offhanded dismissal of such disparate artists as Chubby Checker and Pink Floyd as “sixties music”. From this cavalier distinction came that most inappropriate and offensive of references, that of this enormous body of vital and indispensable art as “oldies”.

Indeed, if the diverse body of rock and roll that happens to have been issued during the decades of the 1950s and 1960s can be pigeonholed by mere chronology, then should not earlier musical art forms such as that introduced by such giants as Hal Kemp, Billy Murray, Charly Patton, Stephen Foster and Wolfgang Mozart also be referred to as “oldies”? And what of such ongoing key influences in contemporary culture as Peter Thomas Stanford? Abraham Lincoln? Benjamin Franklin? Jesus Christ? Are they mere “oldies”, as well?

That said, consider the paradox known as Super Oldies, the label on which this superlative two CD compilation has been released. Super Oldies is the brainchild of Shawn Nagy, whose devotion to the art of bands such as J.B. And The Playboys belies his choice of a corporate appellation. To date, Nagy’s firm (which also sponsors an online radio station) has released a wealth of comprehensive, well researched and annotated collections that spotlight such groundbreaking artists as The Quid, The Shags, Wes Dakus & The Rebels and The Affection Collection.

This 59-track package by the various spinoffs of the band that rose to prominence as J.B. And The Playboys is the most welcome release from Nagy’s stables to date. The Montreal, Quebec band debuted in 1964 as Al (J.B.) Nicholls And The Playboys with Nicholls’ haunting original “Cheryl” for the DJ Enterprises label. The band (which also included Bill Hill, Louis Yachnin, Andy Kelecsenyi and Lorne Doug West) changed their name to J.B. And The Playboys for subsequent releases on RCA Records.

Despite the acknowledgement of their inspirations with spirited renditions of Rufus Thomas’ “Walking The Dog”, Ray Charles’ “Leave My Woman Alone” (by way of the Kingston Trio's definitive take) and the Beatles’ “All My Loving”, J.B. And The Playboys immediately distanced themselves from countless cover bands by relying on strong original material, primarily from the pens of Nicholls, Hill and Kelecsenyi (professionally known as Andy Kaye). To be sure, the 1965 “One Love, Your Love” single is as potent a force as any of the British invasion records. Likewise, the vocal harmony arrangements and unique chord progressions of its flip side, “I’m Not Satisfied” were evidenced in abundance (however unintentionally) in the June 1966 “Last Nite” on the New Colony Six’s “Breakthrough” album. And J.B. And The Playboys’ 1965 self-titled debut album for RCA is one of the strongest collections of original material in the garage rock genre.

Television appearances followed suit, as did Coca Cola jingles (in the spirit of like minded contemporary efforts by Larry’s Rebels) and a starring role in the motion picture, “Footsteps In The Snow”.

However, the band often found themselves as the subject of confusion while touring the United States, due to the rising prominence of John Fred And The Playboys (who had by that time recorded one of garage rock’s definitive moments with their powerhouse upgrade of John Lee Hooker’s “Boogie Children”) and the tremendous success of Gary Lewis And The Playboys.

To simplify matters, J.B. And The Playboys became the Jaybees in June 1966. Yachnin and Kelecsenyi were subsequently ousted from the band (for reasons detailed in this collection’s notes) and were replaced by Pete Carson (ex-Beau Marks) and Jean Pierre Lauzon. Upon returning to Quebec, the group was again offered a role in the motion picture, “Waiting For Caroline” and in the process developed a harder edge in their original material. Numerous personnel changes ensued, and the band persevered into the late 1960s before finally splintering.

In the process, J.B. And The Playboys and their various offshoots (the Jaybees, Peter And The Pipers, The Carnival Connection, Freedom North and solo outings by Allan Nichols) left a tremendous body of highly original and timeless work, which Shawn Nagy has chronicled with remarkable attention to detail and no small degree of passion here. Should Nagy maintain this high standard with subsequent releases (as will doubtlessly be the case), perhaps a change of label name to "Timeless Art" would be within reason.